Curriculum Vitae

Timothy R. Landry, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Religion
Trinity College
Hartford, CT 06106
timothy.landry@trincoll.edu

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Sociocultural Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013.

M.A. Sociocultural Anthropology, University of Houston, 2005.

B.S. Anthropology, University of Houston, 2001.

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

2015-Present Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Religion, Trinity College

2014-2015. Visiting Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, University of Arkansas.

2013- 2014. Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology, North Dakota State University.

2012-13. Visiting Lecturer of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

PROFESSIONAL APPOINTMENTS

Incoming Secretary, Society for the Anthropology of Religion. 2016-17.

PUBLICATIONS

Journal Articles and Book Chapters

2016. Incarnating Spirits, Composing Shrines, and Cooking Divine Power in Vodún. Journal of Material Religion. 12:1, pp 50-73.

2015. Vodún, Globalization, and the Creative Layering of Belief in Southern Bénin. Journal of Religion in Africa 45:1, pp 170-99.

2015. ‘Never Wholly Respectable:’ Divination, Death, and Humanism in Contemporary Anthropology. Anthropology and Humanism 40:1, pp. 177-181.

2010. “The Slave Route: Touring the Inaccurate and Experiencing the Authentic in Bénin, West Africa.” In Contested Cultural Heritage: Religion and Nationalism in a Globalized World.  Helaine Silverman, ed. New York: Springer, pp 205-31.

2008. “Moving to Learn: Performance and Learning in Haitian Vodou.” Anthropology and Humanism, Vol. 33, Issue 1/2, pp 53-65.

Book Reviews

2010. Review of Missing Bodies: The Politics of Visibility. New York University Press, 2010. Reviewed inAnthropological Quarterly Vol. 83, Number 2, pp. 455-458.

2008. Review of Diasporic Conversions: Black Carib Religion and the Recovery of Africa. University of California Press, 2007. Reviewed in conjunction with the publication of Ethos Vol. 36, Issue 2.

Manuscripts Under Revision

Seeking Divine Power: An Ethnography of Tourism, Secrecy, and Vodún in the African Atlantic (University of Pennsylvania Press).

INCOMPLETE LIST OF AWARDS AND GRANTS

2010-11. Fulbright-Hays, Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad. Principle Candidate. To conduct doctoral dissertation research in Bénin. August    2010 – August 2011. $23,306. [Declined due to alternative funding]

2010-11. Fulbright – Institute of International Education. To conduct doctoral dissertation research in Bénin. July 2010 – June 2011.  $23,250.

2010-11. The Wenner-Gren Foundation. To conduct doctoral dissertation research in Bénin. January 2010 – January  $14,979.

2010-11. Nelle M. Signor Graduate Scholarship in International Relation. To conduct doctoral dissertation research in Bénin. January 2010 – January  2011. $2,000.

2008. West African Research Association, Pre-dissertation Grant To conduct pre-dissertation research in Bénin.  June 2008 – August 2008. $6,500.

2008. Summer Research Pre-dissertation Award. Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. To conduct pre-dissertation research in Bénin. June 2008 – August 2008. $750

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE  

2012 – ongoing. Post-doctoral Research, New Jersey and New York.

2012-ongoing. Conducted preliminary observations and interviews to expand upon my dissertation project as I consider the experiences of Americans who practice a variety of West African religions and their derivatives. 2012-ongoing.

2010-11. Dissertation research, worked in Abomey, Cotonou, and (especially) Ouidah, examining interactions among local Vodún (Voodoo) practitioners and international tourists regarding questions of secrecy, politics, and power.

2008. Pre-dissertation Research, traveled throughout Bénin (with a focus on Ouidah), meeting with and interviewing Vodun priests and priestesses, other practitioners, and international tourists, to further develop a dissertation project.

2004-05. M.A. thesis research, employing an interpretive approach and apprenticeship methods, I examined spirit possession in Haiti as a sensory and embodied cultural experience that facilitates processes of socialization in children.

LANGUAGES

French, Haitian Creole, Fongbe, Nago/Yorùbá, Portuguese.